#WIPMarathon May Check-in

I never turned assignments in late at uni, but for some reason I find myself late almost every month with the WIP Marathon update. I think it’s because I’m usually busy on Saturdays, nowhere near my computer, and then the week gets rolling, and you know how that story goes. But the Marathon helps me see my progress and everyone else’s, and that’s encouragement I sorely need!

Kilchurn Castle, Loch Awe
Kilchurn Castle, Loch Awe

Last word count:
119,336.

Current word count:
118,177. That works for me. I finished my 2nd draft and did send it off to some CPs like I planned, so it’s been in their capable hands for awhile now.

On my last day of that 2nd draft, I worked through over 20,000 words. Mostly because they were the last words I’d drafted so they were fresher in my mind and more in line with what the story had become by the time I got to the end. But I was relieved and thrilled to put up 20 little star stickers on my calendar for the day, denoting the amount of words read/revised. 🙂

WIP Issues This Month:

After I finished that draft and sent it to CPs, I was ready to get back to my space opera, WIP #2. I hadn’t looked at it in 6 months so it was pretty daunting. I MUCH prefer revisions to first-drafting. I love research, when the ideas start to organically unfold, but I find I’m way more tightly-wound and in my own head when I’m world building and character developing and drafting. I feel like my brain is trying to find its way through a swamp made of superglue and treacle. This is the period of a million lists, scraps of paper, documents, and disparate ideas, where I’m trying to combine them all into some semblance of a 3-act structure.

Treacle. That’s all I’m saying.

Four things I learned this month while writing:

1. Something about each scene must be wrong, off, and irreconcilable. And that wrongness can’t be understood unless a reader keeps reading.

This is so simple, the idea that every scene needs a mystery to keep the reader compelled. But put this way, it actually feels doable to me.

2. I still don’t know if heavy outlining/planning is for me. I’m a plotter/pantser hybrid, and spreadsheets and documents and notebooks that have it All Planned Out sounds fantastic. But every time I try it, I think, this is all going to change when I start writing, so what’s the point? 

I guess the point is a starting place. I’d love to chart the whole thing right to the end, but inevitably characters and plot twists appear as I’m drafting. I have to accept that I make the plans in order to change them, but that doesn’t mean I can get away with the plans I make now being crap. They have to exist as though they will be written that way. They have to make sense, and be my goal, for now.

I find it too easy to sketch a lame ending and assume I’ll have a better idea by the time I get there. Which, when you think about it, is not what you want to be working toward throughout the first draft process. You need an ending you’re dying to reach. So I need to work on discipline to at least sketch out major story beats that I can’t wait to write.

3. It dawned on me that I will never be a hardcore fan or writer of hard sci-fi. Star Trek is about as “hard” as I get. The sci-fi I’ve read and loved has been varied, but the stuff I re-read is mostly along the lines of outrageous adventures focused on the characters and their interactions, with few tech explanations and long-winded scientific hoo-hah.

See? I just used the word “hoo-hah” to explain something science-y.

I don’t know why this never occurred to me before, but I realised that there are a lot of opinions out there about what truly defines sci-fi, and as for what I am attempting to write in this WIP, I think it would more accurately be called space opera or space fantasy.

I’m in utter awe of hard sci-fi authors, but I’m the first to acknowledge my limitations. I know what I find most entertaining and moving. And that’s what I have to write. And that is absolutely a-okay.

4. I actually am becoming more efficient. It doesn’t feel like it, day to day, but when I look at how much more I accomplish when I stick to a loose routine, and how much quicker I am at, say, ruthlessly revising a scene the first time around, I feel good about the progress I’ve made in the past several years. It’s easy to feel like I haven’t succeeded since I graduated from uni. But as one of my old lecturers told me last year, this time is all work. It’s the behind-the-scenes prep that will pay off, and it’s necessary. It’s not wasted.

What distracted me this month while writing:

After I sent off WIP #1 to CPs, I had two weekend trips to Cornwall, one day trip to London, and a 4-day driving trip to Scotland and back, and not just Glasgow but Oban, which is on the west coast. Then I got a cold which mutated into another cold the second the first cold ended. So May didn’t yield much fruit on the tree that is WIP #2.

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Getting ready to reboard the Hoy Lass from Staffa.

But the trips were all good. In London I saw two old friends from Australia, one of whom I went to Falmouth University with and hadn’t seen either of them in about 6 years. It was a quick, fly-in visit as they were just stopping off here, but it was amazing and felt like no time had passed. One of the best days I’ve had all year. Plus the Scotsman and I spent our third anniversary in the Inner Hebrides watching puffins. Puffins, in person, for the second time in my life. Amazing! <3

Goal for next month:
1.
Complete the Snowflake method (more or less) on WIP #2, including a beat sheet, a rough list of scenes, and character sheets. If I can get the major plot points and an ending I’m excited to write sketched out, no matter how sketchy, I will be THRILLED.

Until next time <3

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2 thoughts on “#WIPMarathon May Check-in

  1. Drafting often feels like wading through treacle…

    Love your second tip! I really need to stop being so vague in my outlines, but I’ve accepted it’s impossible for me to plan every detail of a story beforehand.

    Lovely photos! Good luck with the WIP! 🙂

  2. Castle! 😀

    The early days of a new story are definitely more stressful! I usually find my footing around the 10k to 15k mark, but up until then I keep thinking, “what am I doing, again?” I don’t think heavy planning is for me, either. It was really getting to the point where I didn’t want to do any planning at all! So I’m backtracking a little bit, to more simple times: plan so I don’t end up with a mess on my hands, but don’t over-plan to the point where I’m inflexible.

    “…this time is all work. It’s the behind-the-scenes prep that will pay off, and it’s necessary. It’s not wasted.” <—I love that so much!!

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